~Technology

~Technology

  • Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets


  • 147 stories per week

Ars Technica (/ˌɑːrz ˈtɛknɪkə/; a Latin-derived term that the site translates as the "art of technology", and sometimes known commonly as Ars) is a website covering news and opinions in technology, science, politics, and society, created by Ken Fisher and Jon Stokes in 1998. It publishes news, reviews, and guides on issues such as computer hardware and software, science, technology policy, and video games. Ars Technica was privately owned until May 2008, when it was sold to Condé Nast Digital, the online division of Condé Nast Publications. Condé Nast purchased the site, along with two others, for $25 million and added it to the company's Wired Digital group, which also includes Wired and, formerly, Reddit. The staff mostly works from home and has offices in Boston, Chicago, London, New York City, and San Francisco. The operations of Ars Technica are funded primarily by advertising, and it has offered a paid subscription service since 2001. The website generated controversy in 2010, when it experimentally prevented readers who used advertisement-blocking software from viewing the site.

  • CBC | Technology News


  • 31 stories per week

CBC.ca is the English-language online service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. It was introduced in 1996. Under its previous names, the CBC's online service first went live in 1993. The Web-based service of the CBC is one of Canada's most visited web sites. It currently contains over one million pages of information. CBC also runs the French-language website Ici.Radio-Canada.ca. [Source](https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?search=CBC.ca&title=Special%3ASearch&wprov=acrw1_0)

  • Chrome Unboxed – The Latest Chrome OS News


  • 34 stories per week

  • "when:168h cryptocurrency" - Google News


  • 350 stories per week

A cryptocurrency, crypto-currency, or crypto is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange wherein individual coin ownership records are stored in a ledger existing in a form of a computerized database using strong cryptography to secure transaction records, to control the creation of additional coins, and to verify the transfer of coin ownership.[1][2] It typically does not exist in physical form (like paper money) and is typically not issued by a central authority. Cryptocurrencies typically use decentralized control as opposed to centralized digital currency and central banking systems.[3] When a cryptocurrency is minted or created prior to issuance or issued by a single issuer, it is generally considered centralized. When implemented with decentralized control, each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain, that serves as a public financial transaction database.[4] Bitcoin, first released as open-source software in 2009, is the first decentralized cryptocurrency.[5] Since the release of bitcoin, other cryptocurrencies have been created.

Engadget (stylized in lowercase as engadget) is a multilingual technology blog network with daily coverage of gadgets and consumer electronics. Engadget operates a total of ten blogs—four written in English and six international versions with independent editorial staff. Engadget has ranked among the top five in the "Technorati top 100"[1] and was noted in Time for being one of the best blogs of 2010.[2] It has been operated by AOL since October 2005 and is now owned by Verizon Media.[3] [Source](https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?search=Engadget.com&title=Special%3ASearch&wprov=acrw1_0)

  • NYT > Technology


  • 26 stories per week